Our Job

metrton4Our job is to love others without stopping to inquire whether or not they are worthy. That is not our business and, in fact, it is nobody’s business.

What we are asked to do is to love, and this love itself will render both ourselves and our neighbors worthy.

—Thomas Merton

About Tashi Nyima

I am a Dharma student, and aspire to be a companion on the path. I trust that these texts can offer a general approach and basic tools for practicing the Buddha's way to enlightenment. ||| Soy un estudiante del Dharma, y aspiro a ser un compañero en el sendero. Espero que estos textos ofrezcan a algunos un mapa general y herramientas básicas para la práctica del sendero a la iluminación que nos ofrece el Buda.
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8 Responses to Our Job

  1. paulfarma says:

    thank you. PKL Great Middle Way 於 2014年05月7日 (週三) 9:05 PM 寫道﹕ WordPress.com Tashi Nyima posted: “Our job is to love others without stopping to inquire whether or not they are worthy. That is not our business and, in fact, it is nobody’s business. What we are asked to do is to love, and this love itself will render both ourselves and our neighbors “

  2. kennydshaw says:

    1 John 4:7-8, 16
    “Beloved, let us love one another: for love is of God; and every one that loveth is born of God, and knoweth God. And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him.”

    In my view, the word “God” points to the Dharmakaya.

  3. maximo hudson says:

    Although the term has been popularized for a broad Western audience by HHDL, the term “love,” for Buddhists, is actually quite problematic. Sadly, attachment, possessiveness, violence (as in crimes of passion) are all conflictive emotions associated with the term. Traditionally, the term “compassion.” has served Buddhists quite well, without out the desire-attachment hindrance associated with “love.” Love is indeed a many splendid thing if one wishes to remain attached to the samsaric realm. For those wishing to forgo the myriad of sufferings which attachment to samsara represents, compassion is the key. Which is ACTUALLY what TM was talking about when you get right down to it.

    • Tashi Nyima says:

      Thank you, Maximo. There are four brahma viharas (divine, immeasurable, or boundless abodes or thoughts): maitri (love, or loving-kindness, if you prefer), karuna (compassion), mudita (altruistic joy), and upeksha (equanimity). Love is defined as “the wish for others to be happy”. There is none of the affliction associated with the western connotations. Merton is speaking of such love. And, yes, there should be an easier edit function…

  4. maximo hudson says:

    Oops, Make that, “…many splendored thing.” 🙂

  5. maximo hudson says:

    They should have an edit feature here! 🙂

  6. kennydshaw says:

    The Western (greek) Tradition gas two words usually translated as “love”; eros (the desire for contact) and agape (the wish for others to be happy). The Christian useage us generally understood to be pointing to agape.

    As for the English word “love” itself, it comes from the Saxon word lufu meaning “friendliness”…close to the sanskrit maitri.

    The buddhist useage of “compassion” points to the sanskrit word Karuna, which the Pali commentators define as “the desire to relieve the suffering of others”. Similarly, Maitri is defined as “the desire to give happiness and enjoyment to others”.

  7. Steve Legge says:

    Wow guys! The more I read and hear the dumber I feel…thank you for helping to keep me in check. Words truly can be power.

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