Gratitude

Gratitude is the realization that we are neither independent nor self-sufficient, but part of an extraordinary continuum of events and beings, and the celebration of our mutually supportive connections. 

The understanding of dependent origination explains that everything in this world arises from and is supported by its environment. Everything and everyone is connected. There is no one, therefore, who does not owe a debt of gratitude to others. In this sense, gratitude may be described as our awareness that our lives are supported by our environment, which includes all sentient beings, and our desire to respond in kind to such support.  

Those who are ungrateful or feel burdened by others’ kindness fail to see the interconnectedness of all lives. They build walls of ignorance and selfishness around them to isolate themselves from the rest of the world. The causes of ungratefulness are four: (1) failure to recognize a benefit, (2) taking benefits for granted, (3) self-absorption, and (4) forgetfulness. 

Gratitude is an intrinsic aspect of Natural Perfection. By cultivating gratitude, we come closer to manifesting our Natural Perfection. Cultivation uncovers the gratitude that is already present in us, rather than creating it anew. The means of cultivating gratitude are many, but they all begin with respect for our own and others’ Natural Perfection. 

The more we trust our Natural Perfection and live by its prompting, the more gratitude we feel. Sometimes gratitude is felt deeply, while at other times we may not consciously be aware of it. When our lives are rooted in Natural Perfection, then gratitude is never far away. It is a confirmation that we are on the spiritual path. 

The Meditation on the Mind Ground Sutra states: “Worldly and transcendent debts of gratitude are of four kinds. There is the debt of gratitude to one’s father and mother. There is the debt of gratitude to all sentient beings. There is the debt of gratitude to the rulers of the country. Finally, there is the debt of gratitude to the Three Jewels [Buddha, Dharma and Sangha].” 

We owe thanks to the parents who brought us into existence, for they have given us the opportunity to enter the Dharma. [Thus, matricide and patricide are among the worst crimes committed, and the Dharma considers them unskillful acts of immediate retribution.] Because of the existence of all living beings, we can cultivate the Four Immeasurables (Love, Compassion, Equanimity, Rejoicing) and the Six Excellences (Generosity, Morality, Patience, Diligence, Concentration, Wisdom), the roots of all merit. We are indebted to the rulers of society who ensure our survival and organize the resources that make our practice possible. Finally, as Dharma practitioners, we owe a debt of gratitude to the Teachers, the Teaching, and the community of practitioners. 

To awaken the desire for universal enlightenment (bodhichitta) is the highest form of gratitude. It is virtuous to offer the merit of one’s efforts for the benefit of all beings, to cultivate gratitude to our Teachers, and to recognize how much we are given in this life. Every day to devote our lives to the benefit of all beings releases us from suffering. The way of the Bodhisattva is to dedicate all merit to others, so that they may realize and manifest Natural Perfection.

About Tashi Nyima

I am a Dharma student, and aspire to be a companion on the path. I trust that these texts can offer a general approach and basic tools for practicing the Buddha's way to enlightenment. ||| Soy un estudiante del Dharma, y aspiro a ser un compañero en el sendero. Espero que estos textos ofrezcan a algunos un mapa general y herramientas básicas para la práctica del sendero a la iluminación que nos ofrece el Buda.
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7 Responses to Gratitude

  1. Jason Sebastian says:

    Beautiful. Thank You!
    Question: Should we show gratitude to our ‘rulers’ who are bought out by negative forces?

    • Tashi Nyima says:

      In many ways, rulers are forced by circumstances to do some good, whatever their intentions. We should be grateful for whatever good they do, as well as for whatever lessons we can learn from their negative behaviors.

      • Jason Sebastian says:

        Beautiful answer Lama Tashi. I totally understand what you mean and I’ve never heard it put that way.
        Thank you for clearing my doubts.

  2. John says:

    So even a violent and corrupt state (e.g., the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea — aka, North Korea), although highly repressive, still must provide things like infrastructure — roads, school — or make it possible for others to do so.

    I see that, I guess, but I have a hard time overlooking the gross venality, the gulags and the torment they also inflict.

    Also, asking people who have survived horrible child abuse to honor their parents may be too much until one achieves some distance, perspective — and wisdom.

    Perhaps it is best to begin by the gratitude that is clear and obvious… a kind teacher, a dear friend, freedom from hunger and cold…

    • Tashi Nyima says:

      It is easier to feel gratitude toward those who benefit us obviously, but it is more virtuous to exclude no one. That is the essence of bodhichitta: to wish enlightenment for all, without exception.

  3. Dharma fool says:

    “The more we trust our Natural Perfection and live by its prompting, the more gratitude we feel. Sometimes gratitude is felt deeply, while at other times we may not consciously be aware of it. When our lives are rooted in Natural Perfection, then gratitude is never far away. It is a confirmation that we are on the spiritual path. ” _/|\_

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