Most Infamous

782779840_aMYQH-MMost infamous of all justifications for flesh consumption is the claim that the Buddha ate meat, and that He died from eating contaminated pork.

The term used in the (Pali) Mahaparinibbana Sutta to describe the dish that was served to the Buddha at his last meal is sukara-maddava, which literally means ‘pig’s delight’—a clear reference to a type of mushroom that pigs are keen to eat. The Pali term for pig meat is sukara-mamsa.

Carolyn Rhys-Davids, who served from 1923 to 1942 as president of the Pali Text Society, clearly noted the faulty translation more than seven decades ago, but proponents of carnivorism still trot out this fallacy today.

Unless one is grossly ignorant of the Pali language, or is willfully misleading others, it is impossible to assert that “pigs’ delight” means “pork meat”, as if the Buddha had ordered a fanciful dish at a modern Chinese restaurant.

Let a person not give credence to the many rationalizations given to justify animal flesh eating. What word-jugglers say under the influence of their addictive craving for animal flesh is sophistic, delusional, and argumentative. —Buddha Shakyamuni, Mahaparinirvana Sutra

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Not Real

Nagarjuna-232There is no reality in a dream but nevertheless

we believe in the reality of the things seen in a dream.

After waking up, we recognize the falsity of the dream

and we smile at ourselves.

In the same way, persons deep in the sleep of the fetter

cling to the things that do not exist;

but when they have found the Path, at the moment of Enlightenment,

they understand that there is no reality, and laugh at themselves.

 

Moreover, by the power of sleep,

dreamers see something there where there is nothing.

In the same way, by the power of the sleep of ignorance,

a person believes in the existence of all kinds of things that do not exist:

‘me’ and ‘mine’, male and female, and so on.

 

In a dream, we enjoy ourselves

although there is nothing enjoyable there;

we are irritated, although there is nothing irritating there;

we are frightened, although there is nothing to be afraid of there.

 

In the same way, beings of the threefold world,

in the sleep of ignorance,

are irritated although there is nothing irritating,

enjoy themselves although there is nothing enjoyable,

and become frightened, although there is nothing frightening.

—Nagarjuna, Mahaprajñaparamitopadesa, Ch. XI

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The Primal Vow

amitabha-lIf, when I attain Buddhahood,

sentient beings of the ten directions

who sincerely and serenely entrust themselves to me,

wish to be reborn in my Land,

and recite my Name, even ten times,

should fail to be born there,

may I not attain perfect enlightenment.

—Buddha Shakyamuni, proclaiming Amideva’s Primal Vow, Sukhavativyuha Sutra

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Thoughts

22279804_1116160435180495_9004800618825953625_nWhatever we frequently think and ponder upon, that will become the inclination of our mind.

If we frequently think and ponder upon thoughts of sensual desire, we have abandoned the thought of renunciation to cultivate the thought of sensual desire, and then our mind inclines to thoughts of sensual desire.

If we frequently think and ponder upon thoughts of ill will and cruelty, we have abandoned the thought of compassion to cultivate the thought of cruelty, and then our mind inclines to thoughts of cruelty.

[…] Whatever we frequently think and ponder upon, that will become the inclination of our mind.

—Buddha Shakyamuni, Sutra on Two Kinds of Thought

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Thoughts

12346455_10206258803283331_7513700395590537619_nWhatever we frequently think and ponder upon, that will become the inclination of our mind.

If we frequently think and ponder upon thoughts of sensual desire, we have abandoned the thought of renunciation to cultivate the thought of sensual desire, and then our mind inclines to thoughts of sensual desire.

If we frequently think and ponder upon thoughts of ill will and cruelty, we have abandoned the thought of compassion to cultivate the thought of cruelty, and then our mind inclines to thoughts of cruelty.

[…] Whatever we frequently think and ponder upon, that will become the inclination of our mind.

—Buddha Shakyamuni, Sutra on Two Kinds of Thought

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Goodness

24296522_1212699102162896_6678220774631248616_nThis is what should be done

by all who are skilled in goodness,

and who know the path of peace:

 

Let us be able and upright,

straightforward and gentle in speech,

humble and not conceited,

contented and easily satisfied,

unburdened with duties, and frugal in our ways.

 

Peaceful and calm, and wise and skillful,

not proud or demanding in nature,

let us not do the slightest thing

that the wise would later reprove.

 

In gladness and in safety,

let us wish that all beings be at ease.

 

Whatever living beings there may be;

whether they are weak or strong, omitting none

—the great or the mighty, medium, short, or small,

the seen and the unseen, those living near and far away,

those born and to-be-born—

may all beings be at ease!

 

Let us not deceive another,

or despise any being in any state.

Let us not through anger or ill-will

wish harm upon another.

 

Even as a mother protects with her own life

her child, her only child,

so with a boundless heart

should we cherish all living beings;

radiating kindness over the entire world:

spreading upwards to the skies,

and downwards to the depths;

outwards and unbounded,

freed from hatred and ill-will.

 

Whether standing or walking, seated or lying down

free from drowsiness,

we will sustain this recollection.

This is the sublime abiding.

–Buddha Shakyamuni, Maitri Sutra

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ALL

AMIDA2May all be happy and peaceful.

May all be healthy and strong.

May all feel safe and protected.

May all live with ease and joy.

om amideva hrih

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